KB450130 – Configuring Network Interface(s) with Network Manager (nmtui)

Last modified: July 26, 2021
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Scope/Description:

This guide details the process of configuring an interface using Network Manager (nmtui). Creating an interface or bond will be covered.

Types of bonds: Round-robin, Active-backup, XOR, Broadcast, 802.3ad (LACP, needs switch support), Adaptive Transmit Load Balancing and Adaptive Load Balancing.

Prerequisites:

Server running Ubuntu 20.04 or Centos 7

Network Manager Installed (nmtui)

Steps:

Single Interface

  • In the terminal run the following command to check the interface names you wish to configure:
ip a

  • For this example we will configure interface “eno1”
  • Now to open up the network manager run this command in the terminal:
nmtui
  • It will bring up this UI. Click “Edit a Connection”.

  • Now you can click “Add”, then “Ethernet” or the type you are trying to configure.

  • Fill in the information, as seen below. Make sure to make the IPvX manually set.

  • Once the interface is made you will need to go back to the “Activate a Connection”. Then deactivate then reactivate the connection to ensure it has been established.

 

  • Once competed you can go “Quit” out of the UI, and run the command “ip a” again to ensure the IP is established on the network interface .

Creating a Bond

  • Run the command “ip a” to confirm the name of the interfaces you wish to bond together. For this example we will be bonding interfaces enp2s0f0 and enp2s0f1 together.

 

  • In the Network Manager UI (“nmtui” command in the terminal), you can add a connection as a bond.

  • Now you can add the interfaces from the previous steps to the bond. Repeat for all interfaces you wish to bond together.

  • Now choose a bond type.

  • Like the single interface step, you will need to configure the IPvX settings. Once done you can click “ok” to create the bond.

  • Now go to the “Activate a Connection” tab and deactivate and reactivate the connection to establish the bond.
  • Run “ip a” in the terminal to confirm the bond has been created.

Verification:

To test the bond we can download an application called iperf. Iperf is used to determine the max theoretical bandwidth. Iperf is a commonly used network testing tool that can create Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) and User Datagram Protocol (UDP) data streams and measure the throughput of a network that is carrying them.

  • Centos
yum install iperf -y

ip a #to determine the IP address of the nodes that will be used to perform the test

iperf -s #to use one of the nodes as an iperf "server". The bond on this unit is the one that will be stress tested.

iperf -c [Iperf Server IP] #to connect to the server as a client. This will initiate the bandwidth test.

 

  • Ubuntu
apt install iperf -y

ip a #to determine the IP address of the nodes that will be used to perform the test

iperf -s #to use one of the nodes as an iperf "server". The bond on this unit is the one that will be stress tested.

iperf -c [Iperf Server IP] #to connect to the server as a client. This will initiate the bandwidth test.

 

The output looks like this:
(NOTE: These example images are done without a Network Bond and only display the proper usage of the command. Results will vary.)

 

Troubleshooting:

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